DSO Cancels Season’s First Concerts

dso facebook strike e1286382224407 DSO Cancels Season’s First Concerts

(Facebook photo)

 The Detroit Symphony Orchestra canceled this weekend’s concerts —  the first cancellations because of the musicians’ strike that began on Monday. 

The DSO was scheduled to have performed at the Wharton Center on the campus of Michigan State University, and then officially open the DSO season in Detroit with concerts Friday through Sunday. 

No decisions have been made yet about next weekend concerts. 

People with tickets for a canceled performance have a few options like exchanging for another event at Orchestra Hall; holding tickets as rain checks, or donating the value of the ticket to the DSO’s fund. Refunds also are available. 

For updates and information,  visit detroitsymphony.com or call (313) 576-5123. Patrons can also call the box office at (313) 576-5111. 

No decisions have yet been made about next weekend’s concerts. 

dso strike1 e1286382359845 DSO Cancels Season’s First Concerts

(Facebook photo)

Meanwhile, a group calling themselves the Musicians of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra have scheduled an “October Concert Series.”

This coming Sunday, they’ve scheduled  a concert at Temple Beth El in Bloomfield Hills. Grant Cooper will be conducting. The concert will also feature Robert Demaine on the Cello with the Musicians of the DSO. Another concert is set for October 24th at Christ Church Cranbrook. (Concert details here).

The musicians hit the picket line after refusing to accept pay cuts of more than 30 percent demanded by the financially struggling symphony.

DSO President and CEO Ann Parsons tells WWJ there have been no recent contract talks.

“There have been email communications. And, as recently as [Tuesday] the management offered and hoped to hear from the union before this morning, and we have not heard from them,” Parsons said.

Management declared an impasse Sept. 1 and began implementing a 33 percent base pay cut for orchestra veterans, from $104,650 to $70,200 in the first year. Musicians had offered a 22 percent reduction in the first year to $82,000, which would increase in subsequent years. 

(Copyright 2010 WWJ Radio.  All Rights Reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

  • Geoff

    This is ugly and sad, and both sides are acting like spoiled children. Someone with some moral authority needs to get both sides in the same room and hammer out a temporary compromise until a longer-range solution can be worked out. It would be disastrous for the region if this continues or the DSO goes out of business.

  • fahfah

    All these Union Pukes should be fired on the spot!

  • Jim

    Even with a pay cut it sounds like a pretty decent salary. When your income depends on ticket sales and endowments, you’d better think before doing something stupid. It might not be long for ticket buyers to look for other musical enterprises.

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