CBS62logoNEW2013_blue_final_header_White wwj950-sm2011b 971-ticket-35smb 35h_CBSSportsRad_Detroit

Congresswoman Giffords Moving To Rehab Center

View Comments
giffords, gabrielle

(CBS/AP)  Fresh from a sunny outing that brought a smile, Gabrielle Giffords is moving to a Houston rehab center where her husband expects the “fighter” to continue on the path to a full recovery.

University Medical Center staffers took the wounded congresswoman to a deck at the hospital Thursday, where she breathed in the fresh air and felt the sun, trauma surgeon Peter Rhee said.

“I saw the biggest smile she could gather,” Rhee said. “We are very happy to have her enjoying the sunshine of Arizona.”

Complete Coverage: Tragedy in Tucson

Giffords has been making progress nearly everyday in her recovery from a bullet wound to the brain.

Doctors ticked off other markers of her continuing improvement: She scrolled through an iPad, picked out different colored objects and moved her lips. They are unsure whether she is mouthing words, nor do they know how much she is able to see.

Her husband, Houston-based astronaut Mark Kelly, believes she has tried to speak and can recognize those around her.

“I can just look in her eyes and tell,” Kelly said at a final briefing Thursday at the Tucson hospital. “She is very aware of the situation.”

He said he’s hoping she’ll make a full recovery, calling her “a fighter like nobody else that I know.”

CBS News correspondent Ben Tracy reports that Kelly is so confident of his wife’s recovery, he boldly predicted on Thursday that she would be “walking, talking, and in two months you’ll see her walking in the front door of this building.”

The doctors who will help her offered a more sober outlook.

Giffords has yet to speak again, and the right side of her body is very weak, reports Tracy. She may need to re-learn even basic tasks.

“Not everyone always gets 100 percent restoration, but we help them to get to a new normal,” said Carl Josehart, chief executive of the rehab hospital that will be the Arizona congresswoman’s home for the next month or two.

Giffords is expected to be moved on Friday morning, traveling by ambulance to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base with an escort from a group of motorcycle riders from a Veterans of Foreign Wars post who know her.

Kelly; Rhee; Giffords’ mother, Gloria; an intensive care unit nurse and Giffords’ chief of staff will be among those on the medical flight to William P. Hobby Airport in Houston.

From there, she will be moved by helicopter to TIRR Memorial Hermann hospital. U.S. Capitol police arrived Thursday afternoon to set up extra security measures at the 119-bed facility that is part of the massive Texas Medical Center complex.

The Houston facility is where Buffalo Bills’ tight end Kevin Everett was treated after this life-threatening spinal cord injury in 2007. He was paralyzed from the neck down when he arrived. Now he can walk.

Dr. Gerard Francisco, the hospital’s chief medical officer, will coordinate Giffords’ care.

“It’s going to be a very big team that will address different impairments, but they will have to work together,” he said.

First, they’ll check her vital signs – make sure her blood pressure and heart rate are good. Then specialists ranging from physical and occupational therapists to speech therapists and psychologists will give a slew of tests to see what she can and cannot do.

The strength of her legs and her ability to stand and walk. The strength of her arms, and whether she can brush her teeth or comb her hair. Whether she can safely swallow on her own. How well she thinks and communicates – not just her ability to speak but also to understand and comprehend, Francisco said.

It’s unclear if she is able to speak. And while she is moving both arms and legs, it’s uncertain how much strength she has on her right side; the bullet passed through the left side of her brain, which controls the right side of the body.

Giffords will stay at Memorial Hermann until she no longer needs 24-hour medical care – the average is one to two months. Then she can continue getting up to five hours a day of physical and other rehab therapies on an outpatient basis, Josehart said.

“It’s hard to speculate on the trajectory or course that any one patient will have,” he said.

Despite the steady progress, Giffords has a long road to recovery. Doctors are not sure what, if any, disability she will have.

Sometimes, areas of the brain that seem damaged can recover, said Mark Sherer, a neuropsychologist at the rehab center.

“Some of the tissue is temporarily dysfunctional, so the patient appears very impaired very early on after the injury,” but may not be permanently damaged, he said.

A gunman shot Giffords and 18 other people Jan. 8 as she met with constituents outside a grocery store in Tucson. Six people died and the others wounded. All survivors, except Giffords, have been released from hospitals.

The suspect in the attack, Jared Loughner, 22, of Tucson, is being held in federal custody.

Loughner, 22, of Tucson, was indicted by a federal grand jury in Phoenix Wednesday, accused of attempting to assassinate Giffords and trying to kill two of her aides.

It does not include two murder charges listed in an earlier criminal complaint for the deaths of Giffords aide Gabe Zimmerman, 30, and U.S. District Judge John Roll, 63. Those are potential death penalty charges and prosecutors said they require a more painstaking process. Additional charges are likely.

“The last 12 days have been extraordinarily difficult for myself, my family, but not only us,” Kelly said. “I think it’s been very difficult for the city of Tucson, southern Arizona and our country.

Kelly added that Giffords would be proud of the way Tucson has responded. Memorials continued to grow Thursday outside the hospital, in front of her office and at the scene of the shooting.

“I know one of the first things Gabby is going to want to do as soon as she’s able to is start writing thank you notes,” he said.

MMXI, CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,910 other followers