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Report: Current Flu Activity Is Low; Outlook For Vaccine Is Good

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DETROIT (WWJ) - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the initial “FluView” report for the U.S. 2011–2012 flu season with the message that flu activity is currently low, making this the perfect time to get vaccinated. There should be lots of vaccine available, because the supply is projected to set a U.S. record.

Joe Bresee, M.D., Chief of CDC′s Influenza Epidemiology and Prevention Branch, said since it takes about two weeks after vaccination for the body′s immune response to fully kick in, tt′s best to get vaccinated before activity begins so that you’ll be protected once flu season hits.

CDC routinely monitors influenza activity in the United States year–round with a system that determines when and where influenza activity is occurring, what influenza viruses are circulating and changes in the influenza viruses. The system also measures the burden of influenza disease in the United States, including tracking influenza related illness, hospitalizations and deaths.

More than 110 million doses of vaccine had been delivered in the United States as of the end of September, with manufacturers projecting total production of between 166 and 173 million doses. This is the most flu vaccine ever produced for the U.S. market.

With rare exceptions, CDC recommends that everyone 6 months and older get an annual flu vaccine. This season, people have more options than ever in this regard, both in terms of where they get vaccinated and which vaccine they chose to get.

While doctor′s offices and health departments continue to provide flu vaccinations, the vaccine also is available at many pharmacies, work places and other retail and clinic locations.

In addition to the traditional seasonal flu shot that has been available for decades, a nasal spray vaccine was introduced in 2003 for non–pregnant healthy people between 2 and 49 years of age, and a high dose flu shot was introduced last season for people 65 and older. Also, new for this season is an intradermal shot, which uses a needle 90 percent smaller than the regular flu shot and is approved for people 18 to 64 years of age.

Each week, CDC receives reports from international, state and local participants and within 48 hours compiles and analyzes that data to produce a report that provides comprehensive situational awareness regarding influenza activity in the United States. For more information, visit www.cdc.gov.

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