Why We See Our Breath In The Cold Air

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(istockphoto)

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Education Today
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As the days get colder, you’ll soon notice the clouds of breath that come from your mouth while you’re waiting at the bus stop with kids.

Why does this happen when the temperatures drop?

Every time you exhale, water comes out of your lungs with your breath. You can’t see the water because it’s in the form of a gas that we call water vapor.

Here’s how it works: When the water vapor hits the cold air it cools and condenses into tiny droplets of liquid water. What we see is the water turning into a thin cloud that quickly spreads out and vanishes.

Here are a couple more frosty facts to share with others.

On average, ten inches of snow equals one inch of water. Snow is white because it reflects light instead of absorbing it.

Only a small amount of sunlight gets absorbed equally over the wavelengths of visible light, which makes it appear white instead of any other color.

Now that you know some cold truths about winter weather, bundle up and embrace the season!

Content provided by Oakland University

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