Report Reveals Trend Of Segregation In Charter Schools

EAST LANSING (WWJ) – The expansion of charter schools has led to classrooms being more segregated today than they were 30 years ago, according to a recent report that provides policymakers with detailed recommendations on how to ensure all students have access to a quality education.

Some of the nation’s most segregated schools are charter schools, where students are often isolated by race, income, language and special education status, according to the report, authored by Julie F. Mead, of the University of Wisconsin, and Preston C. Green III, of Penn State University.

For example, 43 percent of black charter school students attend schools that are 99 percent minority, according to the report. Meanwhile, researchers found that less than 15 percent of black students in traditional public schools attend such highly segregated schools.

The report suggests that growth in the charter school sector, for the mere sake of growth, neglects the central justification for their existence: to improve the current public educational landscape for children and their families.

Mead and Green say improving education means serving “all children regardless of race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, language, disability and gender.”

The report provides numerous detailed recommendations to improve access for all students, including:

Released in tandem with this report is a companion report which offers model legislation to carry out those recommendations.

Both reports, “Chartering Equity: Using Charter School Legislation and Policy to Advance Equal Educational Opportunity” and “Model Policy Language for Charter School Equity” were produced by the National Education Policy Center with funding from the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice. In addition, the Ford Foundation provided funding for Chartering Equity.

Both reports are available at: www.greatlakescenter.org.

This site uses cookies, tokens, and other third party scripts to recognize visitors of our sites and services, remember your settings and privacy choices, and — depending on your settings and privacy choices — enable us and some key partners to collect information about you so that we can improve our services and deliver relevant ads.

By continuing to use our site or clicking Agree, you agree that CBS and our key partners may collect data and use cookies for personalized ads and other purposes, as described more fully in our privacy policy. You can change your settings at any time by clicking Manage Settings.