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Mosquito Eradication Program Continued In Warren

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The a female mosquito prepares to bite the photographer's hand at Everglades National Park August 12, 2002 in Flamingo, Florida. The female bugs use the blood protein to feed their eggs then lays the eggs in water. The itch from the bite is caused by the human body's immune system responding to the mosquito's saliva. During the summer, the Everglades closes its camping facilities almost entirely because of the onslaught of mosquitoes. Traps are put up throughout Flamingo where 250,000 mosquitoes a day are collected.  (Photo by Tom Ervin/Getty Images)

The a female mosquito prepares to bite the photographer’s hand at Everglades National Park August 12, 2002 in Flamingo, Florida. The female bugs use the blood protein to feed their eggs then lays the eggs in water. The itch from the bite is caused by the human body’s immune system responding to the mosquito’s saliva. During the summer, the Everglades closes its camping facilities almost entirely because of the onslaught of mosquitoes. Traps are put up throughout Flamingo where 250,000 mosquitoes a day are collected. (Photo by Tom Ervin/Getty Images)

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WARREN (WWJ/AP) - City departments in Warren will begin a mosquito prevention and eradication program aimed at controlling the spread of the West Nile virus and other illnesses.

It is the second consecutive year that Mayor Jim Fouts has instituted the program.

State officials say an unusually warm spring encouraged the early hatching of mosquitoes that transmit the virus. An elderly Washtenaw County woman was reported last week as the state’s first West Nile virus death this year.

Warren engineering, public works, property maintenance, recreation and sanitation departments are directed to identify and treat areas around town where stagnant and standing water can harbor mosquito larvae.

“We’re going to be looking at pools or ponds of water where mosquitoes are breeding — we’re going to treat those, as well as dumpsters, wheelbarrows, tires, hub caps, garden equipment, pool equipment, pipes, drains, buckets, flower pots, you name it,” Fouts said.

Residents also will be educated on identifying things around their homes where mosquitoes can breed. They could be fined up to $1,000 if problem areas are not eliminated.

(TM and © Copyright 2012 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 201 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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