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Matt’s Favorites: First Aid For Gadgets, New Xbox One, Oklahoma Storms From Orbit, And More

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So what’s the latest buzzworthy stuff from the wild and wacky world of high tech? Glad you asked… buckle up, and let’s go!

* My old pal Abizer Rashid and his Keego Harbor tech business Effortless 24/7 is out with a very cool guide to keeping your electronic devices safe and sound: “First Aid for Gadgets: Protecting Your Electronic Devices from Water, Untimely Battery Death and Nefarious Hackers.” Here’s a link to it.

* Microsoft announced Tuesday its next-generation video game console, the Xbox One. The console’s new features will include: voice command, cloud integration, universal gestures and the familiar Xbox Live home screen.

* The beginnings of Monday’s (May 20) disastrous tornado in Oklahoma were caught from space by a weather satellite in orbit.  The GOES-13 satellite, which is operated by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, imaged the movement of storm systems in the south-central United States between May 19 and 20, including the storm that sparked a tornado in Moore, Okla., estimated to be an EF-4 in strength.

* Here’s a very cool guide to some of the weirdest things ever made by 3D printing.

* And here’s a nifty guide to troubleshooting software update problems.

* And I KNEW IT! The next 3D printer is gonna be a Star Trek-style food replicator!

* New York officials have determined that a man who rented out part of his apartment on Airbnb should pay $2,400 for violating the city’s illegal hotel law, despite Airbnb stepping in on the host’s behalf.

* The latest fad for tech companies’ new office buildings seems to involve making them as far-out and avant-garde as possible. And Amazon is the newest firm to jump on that train. The e-commerce giant and gadget maker unveiled a slew of new drawings (PDF) on Tuesday that reveal a series of colossal, mirrored, biospherelike domes alongside a taller rectangular building that could be its new campus. The designs were created by architecture firm NBBJ and also include a copious amount of green space and landscaping.

* When your hormones are harassing you to the limit of your sanity, all you want is a simple life. You want to be able to curl up with the kind of social network that understands you and doesn’t give you headaches. That kind of social network is, increasingly, not Facebook. At least this is what teens seem to have told the Pew Research Center during its latest study. Indeed, the teens surveyed were disturbed by the increased presence of adults and the increased tendency of other teens to angst-ridden self-expression on Mark Zuckerberg’s site. There is, as one teen respondent put it, “too much drama.”

* After stewing in silence for a couple of hours as a parade of senators and professional experts took turns portraying his company as a tax freeloader, CEO Tim Cook offered an impassioned defense of Apple as a solid corporate citizen. Apple has become the largest corporate income tax payer in America,” Cook told the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations on Tuesday. He added that last year the company paid almost $6 billion in cash to the U.S. Treasury, or more than $16 million per day.

* Many Flickr users seem none too happy about the new layout, at least according to a heavy dose of comments posted on the site’s help forum.

* From the CTIA 2013 show in Las Vegas, CNET brings you all the new smartphones and hotspots making their debut.

* Bummer: The market intelligence firm IHS iSuppli has published a new report suggesting it is unlikely that Google will deploy Fiber on a nationwide level. The natural first reaction might be annoyance with this, but when you think about the cost, scope and scalability of such an endeavor, these analysts are likely right — at least for the near-term future.

* Special ops is taking its manhunts into space with a new series of mini-satellites.

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