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Wrecking Crew Documentary Showing At Royal Oak’s Main Art Theatre

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Director Denny Tedesco talks with Tibetan monk Ven. Palden Gyatso and Makoto Sasa at HBO Documentary Films and the International Documentary Association (IDA) present the World premiere of Section 60: Arlington National Cemetary on August 21 at IDA?s annual DocuWeek Festival at the Arclight Theatres,Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Director Denny Tedesco talks with Tibetan monk Ven. Palden Gyatso and Makoto Sasa at HBO Documentary Films and the International Documentary Association (IDA) present the World premiere of Section 60: Arlington National Cemetary on August 21 at IDA?s annual DocuWeek Festival at the Arclight Theatres,Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

sandramcneill Sandra McNeill
After graduating from the University of Michigan, Sandra McNeill...
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ROYAL OAK (WWJ) - While Motown was Detroit’s music staple, The Wrecking Crew was the West Coast’s best kept music secret.

The Main Art Theatre in Royal Oak will be showcasing a documentary that chronicles the recording group Wednesday at 7 p.m.

Big names such Frank Sinatra, The Beach Boys, The Mamas and the Papas and even the Chipmunks have featured The Wrecking Crew’s assistance for churning out hits.

The Wrecking Crew was responsible for many chart topping songs of the 1960s and 1970s.

Documentary director Denny Tedesco talked with WWJ’s Sandra McNeill about the group’s history.

“They were the young musicians who were breaking into the recording studios in Los Angeles,” Tedesco said.  “They were the ones that were being hired to do all the recording.”

The Wrecking Crew even assisted The Byrds, which featured Roger McGuinn and David Crosby, just a young musicians that were still getting a feel for the recording studio.

“In the 60s, they were kids; they weren’t that great as recording musicians,” Tedesco said.  “They could do it, and all that, but it got complicated.  Glenn Campbell was part of this.  Leon Russell was part of this and the story is close to me because my dad was part of this.”

Tedesco explained The Byrd’s hit “Mr. Tambourine Man” and how McGuinn was the sole Byrd member featured on it.

“The only one they allowed to play on it was Roger McGuinn who sang and played guitar,” Tedesco said.  “The rest of The Byrds were very upset about not being able to record it.  But the thing was they knocked it out in three hours where when they did “Turn, Turn, Turn”, another number one hit, it took 77 takes.”

For more information about the documentary screening and ticket purchase click on HERE.  

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