Local

ATF Seeks Tips 2 Years After Monroe Car Bombing

View Comments
Michael Eggleston of the ATF shows the type of explosive and remote  believe used in the car bombing. (credit: Beth Fisher/WWJ)

Michael Eggleston of the ATF shows the type of explosive and remote believe used in the car bombing. (credit: Beth Fisher/WWJ)

bethfisher Beth Fisher
It has always been fascinating to me to learn about what’s going on in...
Read More

MONROE (WWJ) – New information has been released about a Monroe car bombing that injured a Toledo-area attorney and his two sons on their way to football practice two years ago.

Officials with the Agents from the Detroit Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) believe a pipe bomb, containing ball bearings and small arms ammunition with a remote control device, was used.

Officials showed reporters a mock-up of the bomb at a news conference Friday.

ATF Explosive Enforcement Officer Michael Eggleston says it’s likely someone out there knows something about this device.

“They realize that they built something or made something with having no intention of it ever being used against a person, but they recognize the components or they recognize the parts,” said Eggleston. “That’s the person who we really hope comes forward.”

Attorney Erik Chappell talks to reporters (credit: Beth Fisher/WWJ)

Attorney Erik Chappell talks to reporters (credit: Beth Fisher/WWJ)

Eggleston said the person or people responsible for the explosion could choose the precise time to activate the bomb, determining who the victims would be. “Whoever activated this would have been able to see the results of the bomb … And know the children were inside,” he added.

There have been no arrests in the case.

ATF Acting Special Agent in Charge, Daryl McCrary, told reporters that a profiler determined the perpetrator likely has certain traits.

“This’ll be an individual or individuals who seek excessive revenge for perceived grievances. They’re the type that have the motto of: ‘I, I don’t get mad, I get even,'” McCrary said.

Windows were blown out as Erik Chappell, a divorce attorney from Sylvania, Ohio, pulled his sons from the burning vehicle along I-75.  The only thing left was the metal frame.

On Friday, Chappell said his boys, now 15 and 13 years old, have recovered and are playing football again — but life has changed since that day in September, 2011.

“We’re cautious,” he said. “We’ve remained as cautious as we were afterwords today,”

Chappell made a plea to the public to help bring closure.

“Ya know, even if it’s something that they may consider to be more of a minuscule item or a small fact, we would just encourage you to please come forward and provide that information,” Chappell said.

A $20,000 reward is being offered for a tip leading to an arrest.

Anyone with information is urged to call 1-734-887-0060 or 1-888-ATF-BOMB.

[Catch up on the case]

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,328 other followers