Florida Man Claims His Late Uncle Left Collection Of Sports Cards In Detroit Warehouse

DETROIT (WWJ) — Who abandoned a collection of assorted sports cards that some are saying could be worth $1 million? That’s the mystery at the old Cadillac Stamping plant in Detroit.

Urban explorers discovered crates filled with Topps cards in mint condition from the 80s and 90s inside the now vacant warehouse this week that no one put a claim on.

John Hemmen of Florida says he knows who they belong to — his late uncle. He told WWJ Newsradio 950 that he helped put them there in the early 90s.

“I just saw the article on the internet and I was dumbfounded,” Hemmen said. “I was looking at pictures and I’m going, ‘god, I remember that building exactly how it was laid out.'”

A hand-written description of the "1991 Master Hockey Set" by 7th Inning Sketch. The sports cards supposedly from the same run as those scavenged from a stockpile in an abandoned Detroit building. (credit: John Hemmen)

A hand-written description of the “1991 Master Hockey Set” by 7th Inning Sketch. The sports cards supposedly from the same run as those scavenged from a stockpile in an abandoned Detroit building. (credit: John Hemmen)

Sports cards supposedly from the same run as those scavenged from an abandoned Detroit building. (credit: John Hemmen)

Sports cards supposedly from the same run as those scavenged from an abandoned Detroit building. (credit: John Hemmen)

Sports cards supposedly from the same run as those scavenged from an abandoned Detroit building. (credit: John Hemmen)

Sports cards supposedly from the same run as those scavenged from an abandoned Detroit building. (credit: John Hemmen)

Sports cards supposedly from the same run as those scavenged from an abandoned Detroit building. (credit: John Hemmen)

Sports cards supposedly from the same run as those scavenged from an abandoned Detroit building. (credit: John Hemmen)

Hemmen said his uncle gave him some of the cards with the same lot number after the move into the building when it was owned by the Ivan Doverspike Company.

“Mr. Doverspike had two antique cars up there that were up in the same caged-in area on the factory floor,” Hemmen said.

“I just recognized it and want to help his family,” Hemmen said. “If they give me a percentage or a reward that’s also great, but I’m not looking for anything. I just want property to be returned the rightful owners.”

By law, the cards belong to the building’s owner.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More From CBS Detroit

Best Places To See Indie Rock In DetroitIt's called Detroit Rock City for a reason.
Guide: Best Barbecue In Metro DetroitSometimes, nothing hits the spot like good barbecue.

Watch & Listen LIVE