Court Not Swayed By Religion In Michigan Marijuana Case

LANSING (AP) — A federal appeals court has found nothing heavenly about a Michigan’s man claim to have a religious right to grow pot.

The court on Thursday upheld an 18-month prison sentence for Brendan Barnes. In 2014, Lansing authorities responding to a gas leak found 321 plants at his house. Police found more marijuana at another house in Marshall.

Barnes claimed he was growing marijuana under a religious exemption from the Oklevueha Native American Church. He said he paid $25 for a membership card and $200 to possess sacraments.

But the appeals court says Barnes’ belief in marijuana appears to be a personal one, not one rooted in religion. The court says there’s no requirement that he grow marijuana or donate it to the church.

 

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments

One Comment

  1. Michigan has no respect for the 1st Amendment. As many marijuana users have a deep faith in GOD, recognizing marijuana as a creation of GOD with a purpose to adjust the mind to worship and a deeper contemplation of Scriptures, Michigan ignores their right to Religion, Free Speech and Assembly, and uses the marijuana laws to further enriching their police, courts, jails, and lawyer with fines, fees, forfeitures, community services. GOD is ignored for their malicious greed.

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