Algae Blooms

"This Is Not Over Yet," Says Toledo Mayor Regarding Water AdvisoryMore tests are needed to ensure that toxins are out of Toledo's water supply ... instructing the 400,000 people in the region to avoid drinking tap water for a second day.
Report: Lake Erie Water Contamination Could Have Been AvoidedPollack says if changes aren't made -- this problem that we're seeing in Lake Erie, will happen over and over again.
UM Study: Tough New Pollution Targets Needed To Shrink Lake Erie Dead ZoneA new study led by the University of Michigan says nutrient pollution into Lake Erie needs to be cut nearly in half to reduce the size of the annual Lake Erie "dead zone" to an acceptable level. Complicating matters: climate change is expected to make such reductions more difficult, and the rise of a type of phosphorous that algae really like to eat.
Grand Valley Study: Zebra Mussels, Algae Blooms TiedResearchers at Grand Valley State University’s Annis Water Resources Institute are finding that harmful algae blooms in two West Michigan lakes are linked to the water-clarifying action of the invasive species zebra mussels.
Report Predicts Ever-Bigger Lake Erie Algae BloomsThe warming climate and modern farming practices are creating ideal conditions for gigantic algae formations on Lake Erie, which could be potentially disastrous to the surrounding area's multi-billion-dollar tourist economy.
Matt's Favorites: Michigan Connection To Lake Erie Study, Rocket Launch From Space, Summer iPhone, And Much MoreWhat else is new, exciting, fun, troubling and a bunch of other adjectives in the wonderful world of high tech? Here's the latest fun...
UM Says Climate Change Likely to Increase Lake Erie Dead Zones, Algae BloomsClimate change is expected to increase the frequency of intense spring rain storms in the Great Lakes region throughout this century and will likely add to the number of harmful algal blooms and "dead zones" in Lake Erie, unless additional conservation actions are taken, according to a University of Michigan aquatic ecologist.
MTU, MSU Get Grants To Study Extreme Weather's EffectsThe United States Environmental Protection Agency is funding more than $1 million in research on extreme weather by scientists at Michigan Technological University and Michigan State University.