ROGER SCHNEIDER, Associated Press

DETROIT (AP) — The Michigan High School Athletic Association says its unique sideline concussion testing program for athletes in football and other sports is having a positive impact but long-term funding is an issue as it heads into its second and final year.

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Executive Director Jack Roberts says member schools in its pilot program removed players for possible concussions at a higher rate than schools that were not.

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His group on Monday released results of its first head-injury survey of more than 750 high schools from 2015-2016 sports. The association started the program last fall with 62 schools. It includes baseline testing of athletes in football and other sports to help with concussion diagnosis.

The association expects to spend $30,000 this year but will have fewer school involved because of expense and commitment.

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