CBS Detroit – The Michigan primary is next Tuesday, August 4th. While the presidential primary has already taken place in March, there are some key spots up for grabs.

According to the Detroit Free Press, the polls will be open, but experts are encouraging people to vote via absentee ballot. If you need to vote via absentee, it is recommended you go to your local clerk’s office. The deadline is 4 p.m., August 3rd. For those who choose to vote in person, the polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Due to the Coronavirus pandemic, some polling locations they say may have staffing issues and again you should contact your local clerk’s office with questions. At this point, if you have not mailed your completed absentee ballot, rather than mailing it in, it is advisable to drop it off at a clerk’s office or dropbox to make sure it is received and counted in time.

To be able to vote, if you are not registered you still have time, and Michigan election laws allow for same-day voter registration. To be able to register to vote in the election you must meet the following criteria:

  • Be U.S. citizen
  • A resident of Michigan
  • 18 years or older
  • Not serving a jail or prison sentence
  • Must provide ID which can include: Michigan Driver’s License or State ID, current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck or government check, or other valid government document(s).

At the polls, it is recommended that you wear a mask and practice social distancing. However, masks are not required at the polls. As Governor Whitmer said requiring masks may infringe on rights people have to vote. It is reported some districts are training poll workers to sanitize booths and other areas.

Up for election are some important races for the House of Representatives and Senate. Republican John James is once again running against incumbent Democrat Gary Peters for a pivotal position that may determine which party has control over the senate.

The Detroit Free Press notes that with the U.S. Census this year, Michigan will lose a seat in the house as new district lines will be drawn next year.

House of Representatives

In the 13th congressional district incumbent Rashida Tlaib, D-Detroit will face challenger Brenda Jones, who is also the Detroit City Council President. Tlaib has made a name for herself going against President Trump and has been endorsed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

In the 3rd congressional district, Libertarian Justin Amash is stepping down. He disagreed with Trump and was among those who supported his impeachment. Running this year to fill the seat in the 3rd district is Iraq war veteran Peter Meijer, State Rep. Lynn Afendoulis of Grand Rapids, former national guardsman and Sand Lake Village Official Tom Norton, and Lyons businessman Joe Farrington, and attorney Emily Rafi. According to the Free Press, Meijer has the edge with endorsements from top national Republicans.

In Michigan’s 10 congressional districts, Republican Paul Mitchell of Dryden Twp. is calling quits this year after spending $3 million to get elected in 2016. Running for this spot on the Republican side is State representative Shane Hernandez, R-Port Huron, businesswoman Lisa McClain, and former Air Force General Doug Slocum, who previously commanded Selfridge Air National Guard Base. Which is within the 10th congressional district. Whoever wins the Republican primary, will go against the winners of the Democratic primary. Challengers are Kimberly Bizon and Kelly Noland, who is reported as a U.S. Army nurse.

In Michigan’s 8th and 11th congressional districts, Elissa Slotkin-D holly, and Haley Stevens-D Rochester Hills, took control from the republican side of the aisle. According to the Free Press, there is no one opposing them for the primaries. There are republicans looking to topple their seats in November, but the Free Press says no one really has any name recognition or funds against the political war chests the two Democrats have both amassed.

In the 8th Congressional district, which includes northern Oakland and Ingham counties, three candidates are going for election. Paul Junge of Brighton, who was also a prosecutor and news anchor. Attorney Kristina Lyke of Fowlerville and businessman Alan Hoover from Ortonville. Mike Detmer of Howell is also running who has experience working at automotive dealerships.

The 11th congressional district which covers southeastern Oakland and western Wayne counties is facing some stiff competition as well. Eric Esshaki, a Chaldean Birmingham lawyer with Republican ties. The Free Press reports he may have an edge with contacts around Metro Detroit and the Chaldean community. Up against him is newcomer Carmelita Greco of Northville, a former fashion designer from Philadelphia, Whitney Williams, who is a former auto company model and hails from Canton, and Frank Acosta of Northville. Acosta owns a video production company. The other notable for the 11th district is former congressman Kerry Bentivolio-R of Milford. He lost his seat in 2014.

In the 9th congressional district, Andy Levin-D of Bloomfield is unopposed in the primary. Coming in November he will face the winner of the Republican primary. Who is Gabi Grossbard of Southfield, who has a background car sales and commercial real estate, and U.S. Navy veteran Charles Langworthy from Roseville.

In the 12th congressional district, the well-known incumbent Debbie Dingell-De Dearborn, who was elected in 2015 after her husband John Dingell died. He held the seat for more than 59 years. Michigan’s 12th covers western Wayne county into Ann Arbor and parts downriver. Dingell faces medical student Soloman Rajput. On the Republican side is Jeff Jones, who has lost in the last two elections running against her.

In the 14th Congressional District which includes parts of Detroit, the Grosse Pointes, and parts of Oakland County has incumbent Brenda Lawrence-D Southfield, going against Terrance Morrison of West Bloomfield Twp. Morrison is a former Detroit DPW employee who ran against Lawrence in 2016 and lost. Republicans Daryle Houston III and R. Vance Patrick are running in the primary. Houston is a lawyer and former prosecutor. Patrick is a contractor in construction.

Michigan Legislature

According to the Free Press, there are some districts for Michigan House in Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb counties, that if challengers can win a place next week’s primary will be a shoo-in come November. With Democrats looking to be a contender this time for Republican-controlled seats. As it stands right now the Republicans have a 58-52 majority. Oakland county is being reported as one of the key areas for Democrats to take control of Michigan.

Michigan’s 9th House district has a strong contender wishing to take incumbent Rep. Karen Whitsett-D Detroit, from her current seat. Democratic activist Roslyn Ogburn, who is a housing organizer for Detroit Action is running against Whitsett. She has gained union endorsements as well. Whitsett has had some criticism over her praise of President Trump, and her support of the 65-year-old malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, which she credits to her recovery over COVID-19. Who wins this race next week is projected to win in November.

Meanwhile state Representative Cynthia Johnson, D-Detroit is facing two challengers in Michigan’s 5th House District. The 5th district covers the west part of Detroit and is dissected by I-96 and I-94. By far the woman with the greatest recognition is Rita Ross. Who is the younger sister of Motown legend Diana Ross. Ross has a record of public service in Detroit. The other candidate is Jermaine Tobey. According to his website, a few of issues he supports is prison and police reform, bargaining rights for unions, and gun control.

In Michigan’s 38th House District, State Rep. Sandy Crawford, R-Novi is term-limited and cannot run for reelection. the 38th includes Novi, Walled Lake, South Lyon, and Lyon Twp. Republican’s Chase Turner, Sreeeny Cherukuri, and Krista Spencer are vying for the seat. Democrats Kelly Breen and Megan McAllister are hoping for a win next week for a shot in November.


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