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Judge: Give Names To Defense In Prostitution Case

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Attorney Paul DeCailly (WWJ Photo/Florence Walton).

Attorney Paul DeCailly (WWJ Photo/Florence Walton).

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Federal prosecutors were ordered Friday to turn over a computer disc containing more than 30,000 names allegedly linked to an international prostitution ring based in Florida.

U.S. District Judge Arthur Tarnow granted a defense lawyer’s request for the disc but said the contents cannot be copied, printed or shared with anyone besides the lawyer’s client, Greg Carr.

Defendant Greg Carr’s attorney, Paul DeCailly, had complained that, until now, federal prosecutors would not allow him access to the client list.

“Well, it’s relevant. The government listed that it’s going to introduce it in the case, in their discovery exhibit. And, they also included that it’s material to the defense. That was their determination, not mine,” DeCailly said.

“I need to see it to determine if it’s correct; if that assertion is right… It’s as safe with me as it is with them,” he said, referring to the U.S. attorney’s office.

Prosecutors have said they want certain information redacted and were trying to prevent men from being harassed by DeCailly.

Carr, of south Florida, is charged with conspiring to commit crimes related to prostitution. The government says his business Miami Companions set up trysts in many large cities, especially the Detroit area, and Mexico, Colombia and Costa Rica.

Office manager Michelle  “Mickey” Matarazzo and Carr’s ex-wife Laurie Carr have pleaded guilty. They are expected to testify against him at trial this Spring.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer Blackwell held up the computer disc in court Friday and described it as the “so-called black book” of the business. DeCailly, who said he’s entitled to see all evidence as he prepares for trial, asked the judge to intervene in a dispute over viewing the contents.

The government had wanted DeCailly to look at the disc and take notes only in the presence of investigators. Blackwell said there was concern the disc, which includes names, email addresses and sexual preferences, would be used to harass Carr’s former customers.

Tarnow, however, ordered her to share it with DeCailly under strict conditions.

The judge jokingly asked if there was a copy for reporters in the courtroom.

“No, your honor,” the prosecutor dryly replied.

“I tried, guys,” Tarnow said.

DeCailly later told reporters it wasn’t practical for him to look at the disc in the presence of the FBI.

“I do the majority of my work from 9 at night until 3 in the morning,” he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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