Matt’s Favorites: News Glut, LTU Job Session, HP Shareholders Angry, Verizon At A Crossroads, Growing OLEDs And More

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Lawrence Technological University's Southfield campus

Lawrence Technological University’s Southfield campus

So what’s new and exciting in the wonderful world of high technology? See it all here, culled from a bunch of sources…

* Well, what the heck got into YOU Tuesday, O Mighty Michigan Technology Scene? You gave me WAY more news than I can fit in to the Tech Report format. But never fear. It’ll run over the next couple of days, unless you do that to me again. Sheesh!

* Once again, that final Last Thursdays Unwired at Lawrence Technological University for the academic year will be March 28 at Lawrence Tech in Southfield, with the working title “How to get a tech job in Detroit.” Any ideas for presenters, topics or sponsors, give me a shout at mnroush@cbs.com.

* Two leading proxy advisers on Tuesday urged Hewlett-Packard Co shareholders to oust several board directors for their role in the ill-fated 2011 acquisition of British software company Autonomy. including chairman Ray Lane and fellow board members John Hammergren, G. Kennedy Thompson, venture capitalist Marc Andreessen and Rajiv Gupta.

* Verizon Communications Inc. has weighed several options involving its relationship with Vodafone Group Plc and its joint ownership of Verizon Wireless ranging from ending its wireless venture with the European company to a full merger with Vodafone, Bloomberg reported. The U.S. and UK mobile-phone operators discussed a full combination as recently as December, according to Bloomberg, which cited people familiar with the situation.

* Universal Display Corp, a provider of organic light-emitting diode display technologies, said it expects OLED televisions to take off in 2014 and will bank on smartphones until then. OLED displays, which offer better color, contrast and power efficiency than LCDs, are commonly used in mobile phones and are billed the next big thing in TV display.

* Same-day delivery, one of the hottest e-commerce trends, is too expensive for most U.S. consumers, raising the risk that this could become another online shopping fad that goes cold, according to a survey released on Tuesday.

* A video on wealth inequality suddenly goes hugely viral.

* The company that became a cultural phenomenon by harnessing young people’s zeal for engaging through technology and projecting an online persona has, by several accounts, become passé among many teenagers. Facebook itself disclosed in its annual 10-K filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that its users – which number more than 1 billion globally – are spending more time on competing services.

* Meet Yeti, a faithful rover of the robotic kind that sniffs out dangerous crevasses for convoys crossing the glaciers of Antarctica and Greenland, explores ice caves on an active volcano and finds old buildings buried under the polar ice.

* Apple may start rolling out updates to its iPad and iPhone lines as early as April, a recent report says. According to the blog iMore, the tech giant is planning on releasing the next-generation iPad and the smaller iPad mini in the spring, while the iPhone 5S may come out in late summer.

* It turns out capuchin monkeys recognize — and avoid — selfish monkeys.

* Samsung’s new Galaxy smartphone may use an unusual body part to scroll through pages: eyeballs. According to The New York Times, the smartphone will be able to track a user’s eyes to use as a guide for scrolling.

* A newfound comet is apparently on course to have an exceedingly close call with the planet Mars in October 2014, and there is a chance, albeit small, that the comet may even collide with the Red Planet.

* Best Buy, in the midst of a corporate restructuring, has canceled its flexible work program and expects corporate employees to put in traditional 40-hour work weeks at the retailer’s headquarters in Richfield, Minn.

* Here’s another example of an automated assistant that will help you check in with businesses. It’s part of a trend — some of us just never want the hassle of dealing with humans.

* Turns out those foreign tech workers brought in by H1B visas may not be exactly the best and the brightest, but could be merely intended, as critics say, to keep U.S. tech workers’ wages down.

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